Myth & Moor update

Field

I'm afraid I'm going to be out of the studio and off-line a little longer. I'd like to be back by the end of the week, if life permits -- but I've been living in a one-day-at-a-time kind of way, at the mercy of things beyond my control. As we all are really, every moment of our lives, but sometimes that fact is starker than others.

Thank you for your patience, and your messages of support. I hope your summer has been richly creative.

Field 2

"It is good to love many things, for therein lies the true strength, and whosoever loves much performs much, and can accomplish much, and what is done in love is well done."

  - Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890)


Ah well....

Woodland gate

Dear Readers,

I composed a final piece for "Le Guin Week" ...  but as I finished, instead of saving it for posting, I somehow managed to lose it all.  Arghhh. I suppose that's what I get for Blogging While Tired, as I had a very late night last night.

I have to move on to other commitments now, so I apologize for the lack of a proper post today. I'll be back on Monday (with the usual Monday Tunes), and will reconstruct the piece I'd intended for today as Tuesday's offering.

Wishing you a good and creative weekend,

with love from me and the hound.

Woodland window

"Isn't it nice to think that tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it yet?"  - L.M. Montgomery (author of Anne of Green Gables)


Tea Time by Terri Windling

I woke up with a bad cold this morning, so I'm afraid there's no post today. I hope to be back in the studio tomorrow as I've Got a Lot to Do. Fingers and bunny paws crossed.

"As far as her mom was concerned, tea fixed everything. Have a cold? Have some tea. Broken bones? There's a tea for that too. Somewhere in her mother's pantry, Laurel suspected, was a box of tea that said, 'In case of Armageddon, steep three to five minutes.'"   - Aprilynne Pike (Illusions)


Retreating....

Woodland gate

Howard is up in London this week (teaching puppetry) and our house is remarkably quiet. So I'm using this opportunity to take a "Work Retreat" over the next few days, focused on getting my little Secret Project finished at last.

Woodland gate

The Secret Project has taken longer than I ever expected -- but then, it's just a side project, not my main job (which is a manuscript-in-progress), so I've been piecing it together in fits and starts, before and after my regular work day. I've turned into a Studio Hermit this month, with little time left for anything else -- so it's high time to get the SP done. (And the manuscript too. But that's a another story.)

Please wish me luck. Tilly and I will see you all again on Monday.

The Thorny Paradise

Hillside selfie


Myth & Moor update

The Goose Girl by Arthur Rackham

I'm away for the next week, back again on Monday, February 13. Have a good and creative week, everyone. Keep shining in the darkness.

An update on the update: It now looks like it will be another week before I'm back, as I'm still not finished with secret something I'm working on. But I'll have things to show you when I return, and hope you'll find it worth the wait. 

"In a time of destruction, create something." 
- Maxine Hong Kingston


Peter Pan in Kensington Garden by Arthur RackhamArt by Arthur Rackham (1867-1939)


Book decoration by Arthur Rackham

Xmas 2016

Arthur Rackham

Woodland color

Once upon a time in the woods

The studio is closed for the holidays until Monday, January 2nd. My deepest apologies for the lack of new posts recently -- the flu that has swept our household (and half the village) has been both tenacious and severe. But we'll start again fresh in the new year -- and I look forward to resuming our conversations about books, art, folklore, nature, resilience, and living in this world in a good, mythic way. Thank you for being part of our Mythic Arts community, and have a good holiday.

Tilly when she was young, by David WyattThe fairy painting above is by Arthur Rackham (1867-1939). The drawing of Tilly as a pup is by David Wyatt. The poem in the picture captions is by Liz Lochhead (Scottish Poetry Library), after John Donne's "A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy’s Day Being the Shortest Day."


Myth & Moor update

Tilly in the studio

I wrote a post for today called "Walking in the Dark," based on a two-years-old essay by Rebecca Solnit ... but in an odd bit of coincidence, BrainPicking (Maria Popova's excellent blog) has a similar post on the very same essay today, beating me to the punch. Rats!

As a result, dear Readers, I have no post for you today. Plus, I'm back in bed with the flu. (It's Plague House around here. Even Tilly's been under the weather.) Once I'm on my feet again, I'll reassemble the art and photos of my piece around a different text -- assuming I can find one that's equally suitable. In all these years of writing for Myth & Moor, this hasn't happened before, so I'm a bit flummoxed.

I hope to be back in the studio very soon. In the meantime, please go read Popova's piece on BrainPicking. You can also read the full text of Solnit's essay online here, on the New Yorker's website.

Charles RobinsonArt by Charles Robinson (1870-1937)