Friday morning: Living in Gratitude
Tune for a Monday Morning

Recommended Reading:

Thistles 2Thistles in bloom in front of the "John Barleycorn" office.

I'll be getting back to the lengthier "Recommended Reading" lists once life around here settles down a bit (though when that's going to be, I hesitate to predict), but in the meantime, here are a few magpie gleanings to pass along:

* First, as I mentioned yesterday, the new issue of Stone Telling magazine is wonderful.

* Second, I've been catching up with all the fabulous posts on Katherine Langrish's Seven Miles of Steel Thistles, such as Mystical Voyages, Parts 1 & 2, new Fairy Tales Reflections, and book recommendations. Great stuff here, as always.

* If you're an Anglophile, or just love classic British literature, you'll find lots of good book recommendations in Colleen Mondor's "Hail Brittania" column, at Chasing Ray.

* Amal El-Mohtar has posted a gorgeous quote from Coleridge's notebooks ("Why do you make a book?") over on her blog, Voices on the Midnight Air. This one is definitely going into my Favorite Quotations file.

* You may have seen this link already since it's been making the rounds, but I love the post on building a house for less than $5000 on ciracar.com. What a charming hobbit-hole of a place!

* Video recommendation this week: Mark Tiedeman interviews Ursula K. Le Guin.

* Art recommendation this week: Christina Cairns has finished a very beautiful new painting at A Mermaid in the Attic.

And an update on art and artists from my village:

* Wendy Froud gives us a glimpse of her current desktop over on the Realm of Froud blog (and of Buster the cat in a very undignified position).

* Danielle Barlow discusses horses and knitting this month at Notes from the Rookery. (Reading Danielle's blog is always like taking a good deep breath of Dartmoor country air. I just love it.)

* There's  exquisite new art, end-of-summer adventures, and Dartmoor photos at Rima Staines' The Hermitage.

* Virginia Lee goes underwater for a thoroughly magical new portrait painting. (The tiny merchild curled in a shell is an image that threatens to break my heart with sheer loveliness.)

* David Wyatt has posted some terrific pages from his graphic-novel-in-progress, Sunsound, over on his Posterous blog. More, please, David!!! (Be sure to follow the thumbnail links at the top to view all four pages.)

* Howard & Rex have listened to the Will of the People and have posted more 1st-draft pages from their comic on John Barleycorn. They say the plot-line has changed somewhat since this early draft was written...but I'm loving seeing the roots of the JB story all the same. I'll find it interesting to compare such scenes to the final draft of the graphic novel, for I love seeing the creative process at work -- the changes, large and subtle, from revision to revision. And that reminds me of yet another quote, which I'll leave you with today:

"I love revisions...We can't go back and revise our lives, but being allowed to go back and revise what we have written comes closest."  - Katherine Paterson

Have a good weekend.

Comments

Thanks for more good links and recommendations. (And, um, what's in the water in your village that turns so many people into such talented artists? And please, ma'am, can have some?)

I hope the Family Troubles that you've alluded to in previous posts, whatever they may be, are working themselves out. I've lit a candle for you and your family.

Terri, thank you for the lovely comments about my painting, 'Beauty Remembers'. I'm not 100% sure she's finished, but that might just be my insistent urge to tinker with things that really shouldn't be tinkered with any more! Good to have 'Friday Recommendations' back, hope everything settles down for you soon. Now I'm off to go 'link clicking'!

Love the links. Love the thistles. Love the revisions quote. (Sometimes I think I like writing revisions more than the writing itself.)

Now here's a quote for you in thanks:

"Die when I may, I want it said by those who knew me best that I always plucked a thistle and planted a flower where I thought a flower would grow.” - Abraham Lincoln

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