Magic in hand
The poet and the scientist, part II:
wild territory

The poet and the scientist

P1500507

If, like me, you are a working artist striving to combine a love of nature with the creation of fantasy literature (or other forms of mythic art), it is sometimes a challenge to overcome the cultural divide between science and the arts -- in which knowledge of the flora, fauna, and biological processes that make up our world is deemed the domain of scientists, while artists working with the tropes of myth and fantasy are relegated to more ethereal realms.

When I need help crossing the barriers that convention (and my humanties-focused education) placed between the two, I turn to the increasingly-poetic field of contemporary nature writing for inspiration. The following passage, for example, is from "Poetry and Science: A View from the Divide," an excellent contemplation of the subject by American poet and essayist Alison Hawthorne Deming:

"Historically, cultures have been informed by places, by the natural features and resources available to people living in a specific geographic habitat. The 'globalization of culture' is the term in fashion for the phenomenon of everyone becoming more contiguous, contingent, more like us. We lament the dilution of local cultures in the floodwaters of global capitalism, feel a justifiable panic about the pace of this change, and wonder how we will know ourselves and others in the future if our nationalistic and ethnic identities melt away. It is not a contradiction that people by the droves are looking for their own cultural roots, castigating others for past cultural injustices, and documenting difference wherever they can find it, at a time when place-based culture is fading fast. We know something archetypal and precious is leaking from the world.

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"But culture is not only place-based. Culture is also based on discipline, profession, affinity and taste, and in these forms has been around since the beginning of civilization. The problem with the future is that it is difficult to know what will happen there. But it seems likely that these non-place-based forms of culture will become increasingly important. Culture will become more and more our habitat, as cultural learning continues to supplant the poky genetic code. I'm not suggesting we relax our vigilance in protecting actual places and preserving the knowledge acquired by deeply place-based cultures, only that our motivation and ability to do these things may change -- may even improve -- as new cross-cultural affinities emerge. My affinities for literary writers and natural scientists probably say as much about who I am as the geographic fact that I am a tenth-generation New Englander, and nourish me in ways that make my best work possible. Cultural exchanges across disciplinary boundaries can be as fruitful as those across geographic ones. Unlike C.P. Snow, I do not see 'the intellectual life of the whole of western society being split into two polar groups,' literary intellectuals at one pole and scientists at another. I have always been struck, perhaps naively, by the fundamental similarity between the poet and the scientist: both are seeking a language for the unknown....

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 "The view from either side of the disciplinary divide seems to be that poetry and science are fundamentally opposed, if not hostile to one another. Scientists are seekers of facts; poets revelers in sensation. Scientists seek a clear, verifiable and elegant theory; contemporary poets, as critic Helen Vendler recently put it, create objects that are less and less like well-wrought urns, and more and more like misty collisions and diffusions that take place in a cloud chamber. The popular view demonizes us both, perhaps because we serve neither the god of profit-making nor the god of usefulness. Scientists are the cold-hearted dissectors of all that is beautiful; poets the lunatic heirs to pagan forces. We are made to embody the mythic split in Western civilization between the head and the heart. But none of this divided thinking rings true to my experience as a poet."

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A little later in the essay, Deming notes:

"Today fewer Americans than ever believe scientists' warnings about global warming and diversity loss. Their scepticism stems, in part, from the fact that to a misleading extent the process of science does not get communicated in the media. What gets communicated is uncertainty, a necessary stage in solving complex problems, not synonymous with ignorance. But the discipline itself is called into question when a scientist tells the truth and says, in response to a journalist's prodding, 'Well, we just don't know the answer to that question.' ... What science-bashers fail to appreciate is that scientists, in their unflagging attraction to the unknown, love what they don't know. It guides and motivates their work; it keeps them up late at night; and it makes that work poetic. As Nobel Prize-winning poet Czeslaw Milosz has written, 'The incessant striving of the mind to embrace the world in the infinite variety of its forms with the help of art or science is, like the pursuit of any object of desire, erotic. Eros moves through both physicists and poets.' Both the evolutionary biologist and the poet participate in the inherent tendency of nature to give rise to pattern and form.

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As a poet, Deming finds herself drawn to the precise language of science:

"...the beautiful particularity and musicality of the vocabulary, as well as the star-factory energy with which the discipline gives birth to neologisms. I am wooed by words such as 'hemolymph,' 'zeolite,' 'crytogram,' 'sclera,' 'xenotransplant' and 'endolithic,' and I long to save them from the tedious syntax in which most scientific writing imprisons them."

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 Likewise, science writers like Rachel Carson, Oliver Sacks, and Stephen Jay Gould demonstrate how researchers can use literary tools to describe scientific processes:

"...in particular, those aspects of the experience that will not fit within rigorous professional constraints -- for example, the personal story of what calls one to a particular kind of research, the boredom and false starts, the search for meaningful patterns within randomness and complexity, professional friendships and rivalries, the unrivaled joy of making a discovery, the necessity for metaphor and narrative in communicating a theory, and the applications and ethical ramifications of one's findings. Ethnobiologist and writer Gary Paul Nabhan, one of the most gifted of these disciplinary cross-thinkers, asserts that 'narrative and metaphor are more honest, precise and comprehensive ways of explaining an animal's life history than the standard technical format of hypothesis, materials, methods, results and discussion.'

"Much is to be gained when scientists raid the evocative techniques of literature, and when poets raid the language and mythology of scientists. "

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The challenge for a poet, says Deming, is "not merely to pepper the lines with spicy words and facts, but to know enough science that the concepts and vocabulary become part of the fabric of one's mind, so that in the process of composition a metaphor or a paradigm from the domain of science is as likely to crop up as is one from literature or her own back yard."

And that, I believe, is the challenge for fantasists and mythic artists whose work is rooted in the natural world. The divide between art and science doesn't help us here. We, too, must breach the wall.

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Words: The passage above, and the poem in the picture captions, is from "Poetry and Science: A View from the Divide," published in The Edge of the Civilized World: A Journey in Nature and Culture by Alison Hawthorne Deming (Picador, 1998), which I highly recommend. Photographs: Our village nestles against two hills -- one behind my studio, where the hound and I walk most mornings, and the other, pictured here, rising high above the village Commons.

Comments

The Marriage of the Poet & Scientist


Our differences were in religion,
in the place of our growing,
the words we spoke, the tone.
We did not say “pin” in the same way,
nor use the gerund equally.


I could sing, he could not.
He could climb mountains,
I disliked heights. I danced,
he disdained. But there was no
chasm between poetry and science.

We spoke the strophes of astronomy,
the economies of poem and code.
Our love making included skies
and strong stress syllables.
We never argued over learning.


And when he died, I understood
the science of disappearing,
but turned it into poetry on the lathe
of my suffering. There is nothing
remaining of the physical but the poems.


He lives between the lines.


©2018 Jane Yolen all rights reserved

This brings new thoughts (as well as words, as well as word combinations) to me. Thank you for sharing the poem, and the same to Jane Yolen for her poetry...it's nice to start a Tuesday with such considerations.

Beautiful, Jane. How that last line becomes like the Milky Way in this reader's mind. And this "I understood the science of disappearing ..." Wheww.

when science is done with love for the world being studied, it is a form of poetry, i think.

and poetry might be thought of as a science of the heart, perhaps, like all true art.

they are not really so far apart, are they?

Hi Jane

What a incredible poem --

We spoke the strophes of astronomy,
the economies of poem and code.
Our love making included skies
and strong stress syllables.
We never argued over learning.


And when he died, I understood
the science of disappearing,
but turned it into poetry on the lathe
of my suffering. There is nothing
remaining of the physical but the poems.

and how beautifully you intertwine the personal relationship between
scientist and poet with that of the concepts. That last stanza makes me cry, so powerful, intense and true. "On the lathe of my suffering" what a gorgeous image and line. So perfect when considering how suffering ,itself, keeps turning the soul round and round, wearing down the pain to some thing of realization, something of memory and the humility of being human, of being deeply in love. As always, you
move the reader with your insight, language and experience. Thank you so much for sharing this.

Take care
Wendy

Gosh, thanks.

Jane

Sometimes you know it works.Other times one needs to be told.

Thanks all.

Jane

Like Whale

"We too must breach the wall"

The morning began with red skies
Stretched like silk spandex
Above a Salish Prairie
Sailors, take your warnings.

Where is the space for imposters
Who forget the gifts
Of language and meaning
That is more than details?

Loud sounds of wheels
On asphalt broke
Me enough to
Reconsider the dreams.

One metaphor. Perhaps
Like Whale who breaches
From sheer pleasure
I could allow ...

Poetry to be my science
Science a footnote
Exploded into
Metaphor in red.

Hi Mokihanna

I enjoyed this poem and some of the questions or thoughts you raise. Nature and the spirit of the land and its inhabitants are both the science and the poetry of existence. We need to respect it, study it and listen to those silent tenets of wisdom that linger in the air. We must also heed our dreams that often arise from what we have experienced in our interaction with earth and what we remember. These lines are wonderful

Loud sounds of wheels
On asphalt broke
Me enough to
Reconsider the dreams.

One metaphor. Perhaps
Like Whale who breaches
From sheer pleasure
I could allow ...

Poetry to be my science
Science a footnote
Exploded into
Metaphor in red.

and yes those red skies, are not a warning for us to wake up and appreciate what is there and not continue to ruin the most beautiful and yet vulnerable aspects of the planet. We must use what knowledge we have gained to save, preserve and perpetuate. Thank you for sharing this one!

Much enjoyed
Wendy

Thanks for your comments and thoughts about "Like Whale." In the culture of my Mother's People, my Ancestors' language breach the wall in every turn of phrase if you know to hear the messages. For us in the world who tune to the meanings later, at 70 or 96 as did my uncle who passed to spirit a few days ago ... the language returns FULL 'ON' and his children are surprised and call it 'unusual.'

But, Whale, carries long, long memory and the breach is a penetration of joy and potential for us. You might enjoy reading how I exploded the metaphor here:https://vardofortwo2.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-medicine-of-fall-on-prairie-front.html/

Thank you Terri for the space to grow the mythic arts in place, a wall to breach and kick from like all good swimmers in the great pool. Yes!

Hi Mokihanna

I very much enjoyed exploring that part of your blog and learning more. Those photos of the reddish, awakening sky are breathtaking. I am fascinated by how the ancestral language breaches that wall and how it comes with experience and age. what a beautiful and innate gift. Thank you so much for sharing this!

much enjoyed,
Wendy

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