Tunes for a Monday Morning
Following the bear

Myth & Moor update

River photograph by Vikky Minette

My apologies for the lack of posts this week; I've been down with health issues once again. I am making a good (if slow) recovery, and plan to be back in the studio by Monday. Thank you for your patience.

The photograph above is by my friend and down-the-street neighbour Vikki Minnet. Her beautiful studies of the rivers of Devon were published in River Suite, with the poetry of Roselle Angwin (Mudlark Press, 2013).

Comments

Hi Terry

I can't tell you how much I love this photo and what it captures of the landscape and what it allows the imagination to capture. Light gives this scene a mystical perspective. In a way, it lends beautiful illusion to the presence of leaf and stone. For me there is a new story unfolding as I perceive a stray feather in the foliage and the head of dolphin or porpoise in one of the dominating rocks. I think back to the Northwestern tribes of America who are so closely associated with the rocks, the sea and its native birds. This poem came to mind, inspired by both that fantastic photograph and ancient legend.

A Sudden Narrative

Light descends through a rib
of rippling water, recreating
the presence of leaf and stone.

A story that evolves
into a stray feather, the head
of a slumbered porpoise -- and the maiden
who arrived on the back
of a sea mammal with the plume
of a heron falling form her hair. The river says

She came to harvest salt
and with it, clean wounds, anoint bread
and bind the dweller beyond
his or her body --
to all those shadows
the wild landscape had cast.
_________________
Again, thank you!
Wendy

just correcting a typo on the above poem
In stanza two, the word "form" should be "from" her hair.

A Sudden Narrative

Light descends through a rib
of rippling water, recreating
the presence of leaf and stone.

A story that evolves
into a stray feather, the head
of a slumbered porpoise -- and the maiden
who arrived on the back
of a sea mammal with the plume
of a heron falling from her hair. The river says

She came to harvest salt
and with it, clean wounds, anoint bread
and bind the dweller beyond
his or her body --
to all those shadows
the wild landscape had cast.
_________________
Again, thank you!

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