Tunes for a Monday Morning
In memorium

Citizens of the land

Path to the Commons

"As a descendant of slaves and freeman, native inhabitants, and colonizers from Europe," writes Lauret Savoy, "I struggle to understand what it means for me -- or anyone -- to be an American and a human being. Frames of bondage, segregation, forced removal, and an ancient connection to homeland shaped how my ancestors experienced the world and who they knew themselves to be in that world. The legacies of those frames shape us still, their presence malignant to the degree they have been ignored, forgotten, or silenced and then repeated in institutions, and in people's attitudes and lives.

Hound on the path

Ponies on the Commons

"There may be many things about ourselves that my countrymen and -women do not wish to know, but ignorance of human diversity and human contradition only nourishes social injustice and ecological denial. Ideals of freedom, democracy, and independence ring hollow -- and false -- if they remain accessible to a privileged few, the rest of us meant to be kept silent, invisible....We fail ourselves and our children to live with less than the largest possible sense of community, and we fool ourselves to live as if the past is no longer part of us.

Ponies 2

Ponies 3

"Musn't citizens of this or any nation go beyond myth, face hypocrisy and contradiction, terror as well as beauty, to understand the complex dynamics that have shaped the land and ourselves as people? Only then, I believe, can a larger sense of who we are and where we are as interconnected ecological, cultural, and historical beings begin to develop. If, as Aldo Leopold wrote, the health of a land is its capacity for self-renewal, then perhaps the health of the human family may be an intergenerational capacity for locating ourselves within many inheritances as citizens of the land, of nations, and of Earth, and thus within ever-widening communities."

Ponies 4

"We have been carrying on two parallel conversations," Scott Russell Sanders concurs, "one about respecting human diversity, the other about preserving natural diversity. Unless we merge those conversations, both will be futile. Our efforts to honor human differences cannot succeed apart from our effort to honor the buzzing, blooming, bewildering variety of life of earth. All life rises from the same source, and so does all fellow feeling, whether the fellow moves on two legs or four, on scaly bellies or feathered wings. If we care only for human needs, we betray the land; if we care only for the earth and its wild offspring, we betray our own kind. The profusion of creatures and cultures is the most remarkable fact about our planet, and the study and stewardship of that profusion seems to me our fundamental task."

I couldn't agree more.

Ponies 5

For a deeper dive into natural and cultural history by writers of diverse backgrounds, I recommend The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity and the Natural Word, edited by Lauret Savoy and Alison Deming, along with Savoy's book Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape.

And perhaps you'll join me in supporting The Willowherb Review, a new journal dedicated to diversity in nature writing, publishing emerging and established writers of colour with a focus on place, environment, and nature.

Ponies 6

Pathway home

Trace by Lauret Savoy

Words: The passages above are from "Possibility Begins Here" by Lauret Savoy, published in A Voice for the Earth: American Writers Respond to the Earth Charter (University of Georgia Press, 2008), and "Voyageurs" by Scott Russell Sanders, published in Writing from the Center (Indiana University Press, 1997). The poem in the picture captions is from The River of History by Gloria Bird, of the Spokane Tribe of Washington State (Trask House Press, 1998). All rights reserved by the authors. Pictures: Dartmoor ponies on the village Commons in the pause between winter and spring.

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