Tunes for a Monday Morning

Benji at the gate

Awaiting his carrot

This week, Appalachian ballads and American roots music played by musicians from both sides of the Atlantic....

Above: "I Must And Will Be Married," an American folk song from the Anglo-Scots tradition performed by Naomi Bedford and Paul Simmonds -- from their forthcoming album Singing It All Back Home: Appalachian Ballads of English and Scottish Origin. The album was produced by Ben Walker here in the UK, with contributions from Justin Currie, Rory McLeod and Lisa Knapp, and the great Shirley Collins. It will launch at the Cecil Sharpe House in London in June, so if you're anywhere nearby, keep an eye out for tickets. This is a great project to support.

Below: "The Spider and the Wolf," written and performed by Naomi Bedford and Paul Simmonds. It's from a previous album, A History Of Insolence (2015).

Above: "Gallows Pole" performed by American bluegrass musician Willie Watson, a founding member of Old Crow Medicine Show, from his solo album Folksinger, Vol. II (2017). This Appalachian ballad is related to "The Maid from Freed from the Gallows" in the Anglo-Scots folk songbook.

Below: "I'm On My Way," peformed by the brilliant bluegrass musician Rhiannon Giddens, from North Carolina, with Italian jazz musician Francesco Turrisi. The song will appear on their collaborative album There is No Other, due out next month.

Above: "Rain and Snow," an Appalachian ballad performed by American bluegrass musician Molly Tuttle and her band. This performance was recorded in Bristol, England, in 2016.

Below: "Jericho" by Mile Twelve, a five-piece bluegrass band from Boston (Evan Murphy, Catherine Bowness, Nate Sabat, Bronwyn Keith-Hynes and David Benedict). The song is from their new album, City on a Hill (2019).

Above: "All in One" by Copper Viper (Robin Joel Sangster and Duncan Menzies), an American bluegrass & British folk duo based in London. The song is from their new album, Cut it Down, Count the Rings (2018).

And to end with something just a little different: "Pipeline Swallowtails" by Sarah Louise, a 12-string guitarist from North Carolina who is half of the Appalachian folk duo House and Land. The song is from her strange and magical solo album, Deeper Woods (2018).

Oakleaves

Jenny's horse in his winter pasture


Tunes for a Tuesday morning

Margaret Lockwood in the film The Wicked Lady

Let's start the week (albeit a day late) with some fabulous folk songs that up-end traditional, heteronormative ideas about gender....

Above: "The Handsome Cabin Boy," which is one of a number of traditional songs (The Female Drummer, When I Was a Fair Maid, Bold William Taylor, etc.) about young women who dress in male clothing in order to live the life of a sailor or soldier. This lovely version is performed by Bill Jones, a folk musician based in Sunderland. It appeared on her first album, Turn to Me (2000). 

Below: "Sylvie" (a.k.a. "Sovay"), a traditional ballad about a female highwayman* performed by Rachael McShane (from the north-east of England) and The Cartographers. The song appears on their new album When All is Still (2018).

Above: "Gentleman Jack," written and performed by O’Hooley & Tidow, a folk duo from Yorkshire. The song, as music critic Alex Gallacher explains, is about "the 19th Century diarist, writer, traveller, mountaineer, rural gentlewoman, and industrialist Anne Lister. Anne kept much of her life written in 4 million words worth of diaries, which were hidden away for many years, and then thankfully later uncovered. It was discovered that around a sixth of them were written in secret code, which when deciphered, revealed a lot more than just her business activities at Shibden Hall, Halifax. Behind her back, the disapproving local residents would refer to Anne as ‘Gentleman Jack’." The song appeared on O'Hooley & Tidow's second album, The Fragile (2012).

There aren't as many songs about men dressing as women, but here's a particularly lovely one: "Gloria," written and performed by the Anglo-Welsh trio Trials of Cato. This moving song about cross-dressing and gender fluidity is from their debut album Hide and Hair (2018), which I am thoroughly addicted to.

Simply switching the gender of the singer of a love song can help us to hear it in a whole new way. Here are two fine examples:

Above, "Beeswing," the Richard Thompson classic, performed by Leicester-based folk musician Grace Petrie. It's from her terrific new album Queer as Folk (2018).

Below, "My Love's in Germany," a traditional Scottish ballad (adapted from a poem by Hector Macneil), beautifully performed by Trials of Cato.

And one more song to end with:

"Gonna Write Me a Letter" by the Irish "Celtgrass" band We Banjos 3, from Galway. The song appeared on their exuberant debut album, Roots of the Bajo Tree (2012).

Gonna write me a letter

*For more songs about kick-ass women, see Dianne Dugaw’s Warrior Women and Popular Balladry, 1650-1850 (University of Chicago Press). The photograph above is Margaret Lockwood as a female highwayman in the 1945 film The Wicked Lady. Many thanks to Ben Perkins, Jessica Wick, and Amal El-Mohtar for their suggestions for this post.


Tunes for a Monday Morning

The Rift Within by Arthur Hughes

I'm back home after two weeks on the road, and back in my hillside studio. My desk is piled high with work, my email Inbox is overflowing, and the pages of my neglected work-in-progress are glaring at me balefully...but the sun is shining, the birds are singing, and the hound lounges happily beside me, glad to return to normal routines. So let's start the week with some traditional ballads to put us all in a storytelling mood....

Above: "Lover's Ghost" (Child Ballad #272), performed by The Rosie Hood Trio. Rosie Hood is a singer/songwriter from Wiltshire, joined here by Nicola Beazley and Lucy Huzzard for a new video released last week.

Below: "The Bonnie Earl O' Moray" (Child Ballad #181) performed by Said the Maiden (Jess Distill, Hannah Elizabeth, Kathy Pilkinton), a vocal harmony trio from Hertfordshire. The song can be found on their debut album, Here's a Health (2017).

Above: Said the Maiden again, performing "The Soldier and the Maid" (Child Ballad # 299).

Above: "False Lady" (Child Ballad #68) peformed by Teyr (James Gavin, Dominic Henderson, Tommie Black-Roff), from London. The song can be found on the trio's debut album, Far From The Tree (2016).

Above: "Banks of the Newfoundland," performed by Teyr. This one is a "capstan shanty" collected by Cecil Sharp in 1915, and may be related to the transportation ballad "Van Diemen's Land."

And last, an old performance from one of the primary bands of 20th century folk revival: "The Lady of Carlisle" (also known as "The Lion's Den") performed by Pentangle in 1972. Variants of this broadside ballad have been collected in Scotland, Ireland, Somerset, and the mountains of Kentucky.

Happy hound

For more information on Child Ballads go here, and on Broadside Ballads go here. The painting above is by Arthur Hughes (1832-1915).


Tunes for a Monday Morning

Traveller and Dog by Matt Bigwood

I'll be out of the office on Monday, but rather than leave you without music to start the week, I've set this post up in advance....

In the video above, the lovely Sam Lee performs a trio of gypsy songs accompanied by Flora Curzon (fiddle), Josh Green (percussion), and Jon Whitten (ukulele). The songs are "Over Yonders Hill" (collected here in the West Country), "Lovely Molly," and "Goodbye My Darling." 

Sam is a wildly innovative folk singer and song collector who learned his vocal style from the UK's Travelling community. He talks about the genesis of the songs above -- but if you'd like to learn more about them, and about his apprenticeship with Scottish Traveller balladeer Stanley Robertson, watch "Ballad Lands," a short flm on the subject shot in Aberdeen.

In the video below, filmed by Lucy Kaye, he brings his recording of the Napoleonic ballad "Bonny Bunch of Roses" back to woman he learned it from, the great Traveller singer Freda Black. For more information on the Tradition Bearers who have carried these songs, stories, and folkways to the present day, I recommend the Song Collectors Collective website, which is a wonderful resource.

The photograph above is "Traveller and Dog" by Matt Bigwood, the portrait of a young Traveller on his way home from the Stow on the Wold Horse Fair. The photograph below is "Writer and Dog" by my husband, taken this summer here on Dartmoor. I hope to be back in the office/studio tomorrow, health permitting.

''Writer and Dog'' by Howard Gayton

All rights to the music and photographs above reserved by the musicians and photographers.


Tunes for a Monday Morning

Deer sketch by Daniel Egneus

This week I'm focused on Child Ballads: on old, old songs performed in new ways, along with a couple of other good pieces rooted in traditional folkways.

Above: "The Fair Flower of Northumberland" (Child Ballad #9) performed by Scottish musician Alasdair Roberts, with Amble Skuse and David McGuinness. The song appears on their strange and remarkable new album, What News. The video, filmed at the University of Glasgow, features performance artist Sgàire Wood.

Above: "Abbots Bromley Horn Dance" performed by Stick in the Wheel, from East London.  The video, containing archival footage from Abbots Bromley, was directed by Ian Carter, with animation by Teresa Elizabeth Lobos. To learn more about the Abbots Bromley Horn Dance go here. To read about deer in folk ritual and myth, go here and here.

Below: "Over Again" performed by Stick in the Wheel.

Both songs are from their terrific new album, Follow Them True.

Above: "Willie's Lady" (Child Ballad #6) performed by folk legend Martin Carty. This live version comes from the album The Folk Vault: Martin Carthy, Live in Whitby 1984, released in 2013.

Below: "The Elfin Knight" (Child Ballad #2) performed by another folk legend, Norma Waterson, with Norma & Martin's daughter, Eliza Carthy, and the Gift Band. It's from their new album, Anchor, which I highly recommend.

Deer sketch by Daniel Egneus

Oh heck, here's one more:

"Matty Groves"  (Child Ballad 81) performed by the French/American band Moriarty. The song travelled to the New World with early Anglo/Scots settlers, becoming part of the North American traditional songbook too.

Drawing by Daniel Egneus

The art today is by Daniel Egnéus.